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5 Ways to Improve Your MSP Service Level Agreement (SLA)

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5 Ways to Improve Your MSP Service Level Agreements (SLAs)

SLAs are the foundation of your MSP business. They are essential to building strong client relationships and must be clear, reasonable and well-constructed.

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Helping Clients Understand Cloud Computing and Cloud Technology

Posted February 17, 2016by Matt Mainhart

What is the cloud? Does my data really sit on fluffy white clouds and float above the world? What happens when an airplane drives through my spreadsheet, or a bird gets stuck in my document?

The scope of cloud technology and cloud computing is growing, as is its adoption. Your prospects and clients could be using it right now and not even know it. When working with the right IT services provider, cloud technology helps small-to-medium-sized businesses scale up the IT needs of their companies much faster than setting up new hardware.

But what does this term “cloud” mean to your clients?

We wrote a whole eBook about how to explain the cloud to your clients, but here are four quick tips to help them better understand the role the cloud plays in their workday. Download our white label version at the end to use in your next email send!

 

What is the Cloud?

The cloud is virtual and therefore does not require any hardware of your own to deliver a service. Cloud technology can deliver that service to you, without having to install anything or have it on a server at your business. This is something that you can access remotely, or via the Internet through your web browser. Offsite, secure third-party data centers manage all of your cloud data so that you can access it at your convenience. 


You May Already be Using the Cloud
 

Are you using Gmail? Amazon Music? A Kindle? Dropbox? These are all cloud services that store the data you access. All you have to do is log in to their servers to get what you need. If you use an Apple iPhone or iPad, then you're familiar with the iCloud service, the cloud technology that allows you to sync and upload your photos and contacts.


Why Use the Cloud?

The cloud is convenient for accessing and backing up data no matter where you go. With it, you can access servers anywhere, rather than just locally from your office. This allows you to perform your job duties at home and on the go! There is no need to carry around (and risk losing) USB drives with sensitive information on them. If you lose that USB drive, then your files are gone forever. If you back them up to the cloud or store them there, however, you can easily retrieve that data.


Why is the Term “Cloud” Used?

There is both a literal and figurative meaning here. Have you ever laid down in the grass, and looked up at the clouds in the sky? Oh, look, an elephant! A boat! Oh nice, a dinosaur! But the person next to you may not see the same shapes. They may see a sandwich, a skyscraper or an airplane in the clouds instead. The possibilities are almost endless, and not everyone has the same vision. Cloud technology is similar, offering a plethora of possibilities to help support and scale your business. Also, clouds are generally always above us. Just head on up, and grab whatever you need on-demand. The sky is always accessible.


So, you can store and access files in the Cloud. You can use cloud-hosted applications, like Gmail and GoogleDocs. Finally, the cloud gives you access to your data anywhere with a network connection. This all sounds great, right?

It is, but as with anything on the Internet, these services need to be used responsibly.

In our next installment, we will look into how you can keep yourself and your data safe while utilizing cloud services. Stay tuned!

Download these tips to send to clients or prospects! 

Click-to-Download-Understanding-Cloud-Technology-Quick-Tips  

Previously one of the main trainers on our white label IT Help Desk, Matt now serves as Technical Sales Engineer. Holding a CompTIA Executive Certificate in Channel Management, as well as CompTIA A+, CompTIA Cloud Essentials, HDI Service Center Team Lead and Six Sigma Green Belt Certifications, he is here to optimize service delivery for MSPs and IT professionals.

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